Guruvayur

Guruvayur | Trissur | Kerala
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Guruvayur is home to the historic Sree Krishna Temple, called the Dwaraka of the South. It is among the most revered and popular pilgrimage destinations in Kerala and the entire country. The central shrine is believed to have been rebuilt in 1638 C.E. The architectural style and individual elements inside the shrine are beautiful representations […]

Guruvayur is home to the historic Sree Krishna Temple, called the Dwaraka of the South. It is among the most revered and popular pilgrimage destinations in Kerala and the entire country. The central shrine is believed to have been rebuilt in 1638 C.E. The architectural style and individual elements inside the shrine are beautiful representations of the history of the place.As per tradition, the shrine faces the East with two Gopurams (tower), one in the East (Kizhakkenada) and other in the West (Padinjarenada).  In the front and the east side of the Nalambalam (a square shaped column) lie the pillars of light called Deepastambam. There are a number of such light pillars in the temple. The eastern side’s Deepastambam is 24 feet in height and has thirteen circular receptacles, making it an absolutely spectacular sight when lit. Another famous sight here is the Dwajasthamba. It is a flag-staff, around 70 feet tall, fully covered with gold.  The square shaped Sree Kovil has two stairs and three rooms inside and has aninner room known as Garbhagriha. This is where the idol of Sree Krishna is placed. One can also find images of Ganapathy, Lord Ayyappa and Edathedathu Kavil Bhagavathy inside the temple. The healing powers of the shrine drive many to visit it in large numbers. Only Hindus are allowed inside the Temple. Lord Krishna was born as the son of Vasudeva and Devaki in the dwapara yuga. He was not an ordinary boy! He performed wonderful deeds and everyone was convinced that the boy was none other than Lord Vishnu in human form, an avatar of Vishnu or the perfect manifestation of the supreme power. Before leaving the earth to the heavenly abode, Lord Krishna told Udhava, his foremost disciple that he had installed the image of Lord Vishnu in the temple built by him at Dwaraka.

Later Dwaraka was submerged in the sea and Brihaspathi (Guru) recovered the idol and with the assistance of Vayu (Wind God). Together, they traveled all over India in search of a holy place and finally reached Kerala. Here, with the help of Parasurama, they located a holy spot. Guru and Vayu installed the image of Lord Vishnu (Lord Krishna) in the temple built by Viswakarma, the architect of the Gods. As Guru and Vayu together founded the temple, the place came to be called ‘Guruvayupura’ in accordance with Lord Shiva’s wish. Later the name was shortened to Guruvayoor In Kerala, this is probably the only temple that hosts the maximum number of marriages and rice feeding ceremonies (the ritual first meal for infants). It was also the hub of the ‘Guruvayoor Sathyagraha’ , a historic movement demanding temple entry rights for the ‘so called’ lower castes.The historic temple is shrouded in mystery. According to local belief, the temple was created by ‘Guru’, the ‘preceptor of the gods’ and ‘Vayu’, the ‘god of winds’. The eastern ‘nada’ is the main entrance to the shrine. In the ‘Chuttambalam’ (outer enclosure) is a 33.5-m tall gold-plated ‘Dwajastambham’ (flagpost). There is also a 7 m high ‘Deepastambham’ (pillar of lamps), whose thirteen circular receptacles provide a truly brillant spectacle, when lit. The square ‘Sreekovil’ is the sacred sanctum sanctorum of the temple, housing the main deity. Within the temple, there are also the images of Ganapathy, Sree Ayyappa and Edathedathy Kavil Bhagavathy. Only Hindus are allowed inside the temple. Punnathoorkotta, which is at a distance of 2 kms from Guruvayoor is home of 50 temple elephants, offers unusual spectacles of the gentle pachyderm.

Map of Guruvayur